A blog about digital government, communications, citizen satisfaction & engagement, GovDelivery, and other e-government issues
Header

On this day, we, like many of you, are taking a moment to remember the tragedy of the 9/11 terror attacks.

In the wake of the many emergencies we see every year, from terror attacks to natural disasters, emergency situations seem to be on the rise. And, as the number of emergencies increase, so does the need for government organizations to connect and alert their residents, communities, and other stakeholders quickly and efficiently.

I recently read the article “3 Tips for Posting Emergency Information Online”. In the article, a product manager from Google’s Crisis Response team discusses a few ways to share emergency information online and how search engines can utilize it.

While it’s always important to make data easily searchable and available on open platforms, posting information on a website or open map isn’t enough. If a citizen is trapped in their basement during a severe storm with a cell phone that doesn’t have Internet capabilities, they can’t utilize a search engine. They can’t access a shared local map. They can’t access an RSS feed. How will they get the information they need to stay safe?

During an emergency, the search engines, maps and open data help, but it’s so much more impactful to push information out and reach people directly instead of relying on them to browse for a landing page.

That’s why I wanted to respond to this article with: 3 tips for getting emergency information to the public

1. Build Your Audience 

mic-and-audience

While organizations should focus and plan for outbound communications during an emergency, it’s even more critical for them to focus on who they will communicate with. Powerful technology tools and strategies are critical for emergency messaging, but your message won’t matter if no one sees it

When an emergency strikes, that’s NOT the time to try and find an audience of people in an affected area. Emergency groups MUST collect and engage a digital audience throughout the year, making it easier to connect with more people during an emergency.

All departments within government organizations should be building a direct audience of email addresses and phone numbers daily. If someone signs up for Parks and Recreation updates, they should be prompted to sign up for emergency communications at the same time.

2. Reaching People in a Mobile World

Most emergency communicators have an e911 list that gives them the ability to call landlines in an affected area. But the plain truth is that in today’s world, landlines are dying.  Data from a recent CDC study that showed more than 50% of Americans don’t have or use landline phones.  Combine that with the fact that there are over 322 million wireless phones in the United States, and emergency communicators now have a daunting task of reaching everyone on the go.

While it’s important to reach landlines, emergency managers who rely mainly on e911 technology are not reaching everyone they need to. Government organizations charged with keeping citizens safe and informed need to find new ways to communicate, across old and new channels, to provide safety information to citizens during an emergency.

mobile_devices_final

To reach the broadest audience, emergency communications need a multichannel approach: send emails, SMS text messages, voice messages, social media posts AND display emergency information with a prominent Web banner. And if you want to take your efficiency to the next level, you should be able to disseminate your emergency message across all these channels from one platform.

 

Bonus tip: make sure your organization is able to integrate with FEMA’s IPAWS system, which can further disseminate your message across TV, radio, digital signs, and mobile push notifications (like Amber Alerts).

3. Focus on the content, not the process

But what about when an emergency really does hit? Are you focusing on content or process? Is it easy for you to get a message out, or are you fumbling with a system that you haven’t used in months?

Earlier I mentioned the importance of working across departments to build an audience, and the execution process is no different. If emergency management and other departments combine forces and integrate communications, the key communications staff will be familiar with the system and will be prepared and trained on how to send a message.

Having an emergency response plan in place critical, but emergency management personnel also need to leverage updated technology to take advantage of communications tools that are simple and automated. Because during an emergency, if you can save a few hours, minutes, or even seconds by using automation, that matters.

In the aforementioned article, Matthew Stepka, Google vice president of technology for social impact, was spot on in advising government organizations to publish advised alerts using open Web formats like RSS. Not only does that make this data available to Google, but it also makes the data available for automated and immediate outbound messaging. Emergency managers can hook their digital communications tool to these feeds, which can automatically package and re-purpose that content for email, SMS, social media and more.

The most successful emergency managers will leverage the strategies around sending critical information directly to the public, while also making that information available and open online. In the end, the more people you reach, the more people you’ll save.

In the public sector, email is an essential component of any best-in-breed communications strategy. With the steady increase in worldwide smartphone usage, email has become the fastest and most efficient way to reach people wherever they are. And because email offers a direct and personalized connection to your stakeholders, it’s imperative that you send email and that your email gets read. However, with advances in technology occurring every day, the world of email is dynamic and ever changing. When it comes to rules for reaching the inbox, no two email clients are the same.

Google’s popular email client, Gmail, recently began a roll out of their new inbox design which changes the way emails are organized and viewed. The new design automatically filters all emails, including those from the public sector, into four default inbox “tabs”: Primary, Social, Promotions and Updates.

newinbox

This change has some public and private sector digital communicators up in arms. Why? Many worry that this change creates default inbox categories that email users may not explore. The perception is that if content lands in one of these new tabs, it will decrease opens, clicks, and overall subscriber engagement. At GovDelivery, we simply aren’t finding this to be the case. Engagement rates have not changed significantly and there are even some benefits that come with the newly organized Gmail inbox. So fear not! We have everything you need to know about the new changes at Gmail.

What do the tabs mean? According to Gmail, the Primary tab contains person-to-person conversations and messages that don’t appear in other tabs. The Promotions tab holds deals, offers and other marketing emails. Messages from social networks, media-sharing sights, dating services, and other social websites will be filtered into the Social tab. The Updates tab contains personal, auto-generated updates including confirmations, receipts, bills and statements. Any messages from online groups, discussion boards and mailing lists should arrive in the Updates tab. The Updates and Forums tabs typically aren’t enabled by default.

newtabs

Are the tabs configurable? Yes! Gmail users can turn these tabs off if they prefer the classic inbox view. They can also customize their tab setup based on how they prefer to organize their inbox. Gmail provides detailed instructions around how to do that here.

Users still have the option to “star” their messages. Stars let users easily mark certain messages as important or to indicate that they need to reply to them later. With the new inbox, any “starred” messages are automatically moved to the Primary tab. This feature can also be configured and turned off.

Apptabs

What about mobile? With more and more email people reading email on their mobile device each day, it’s important to look at how the new tabs change the mobile viewing experience. According to a study conducted by email testing and tracking company Litmus, only 19% of Gmail opens actually occur in Gmail on a desktop computer. A whopping 66% of Gmail opens are occurring on mobile devices.

However, the number one email client for Gmail users is the iPhone’s built-in mail client, accounting for 34% of all Gmail opens. Interestingly, the iPhone’s native email application does not support Gmail tabs, so there is no impact here.

While Android phones and the Gmail app for iPhone do support the new tabs, this makes up a smaller percentage of opens (20%, according to Litmus).

Inbox tab organization isn’t new. Add-ons and applications like Priority Inbox and Clean Sweep have been offering sorting and organization functionalities to email users for years. While new filtering options like these can affect how your Gmail users receive and interact with your emails, these new tabs make it easier for readers to find your messages. Instead of being pushed to the second or third page of the Gmail inbox behind Facebook or Twitter notifications, marketing promotions, etc. your emails may have their own placement at the top of the Updates tab.

As Gmail tabs become more widely adopted, users will inherently know where to go to find your messages.

What’s next? As your partners in communications, GovDelivery watches deliverability for our clients closely. As we mentioned earlier, government organizations that send email to stakeholders through GovDelivery have not experienced a noticeable decrease in engagement across the board, and we are always working behind the scenes to ensure optimal delivery of your bulletins.

While it’s not necessary, or recommended, to take any action to bypass Gmail’s new filtering, there are a few things we’ve seen email industry communicators do to be proactive in making sure their emails are getting read:

  • To increase the likelihood of your communications landing in the Primary folder, increase your readers’ engagement with your messages as much as possible. Include smaller bits of information that require readers to click through to page on your website to read the rest of your message. This will also increase your website traffic and allow you to connect stakeholders to additional information you offer that they may not know about.
  • Remind subscribers to update their Gmail preferences so that you as a sender always appear in a specific tab (directions here). Many companies in the private sector have been doing this for quite some time. Here are a few examples:

examples

  • You can also do nothing at all! Ending up in another folder, like Updates, isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Arriving in a separate tab means your emails will land among less competition. This means less chance of mass-deletion and a higher chance of grabbing your audience’s attention.

While Gmail is the first email client to implement tabs on their users’ behalf, it’s important to watch and see if Yahoo and Outlook (formerly Hotmail) mimic Gmail’s new inbox platform.

For more information on this change to Gmail, check out their recent blog post.

Do you have a Gmail account? Are you noticing any changes to your personal email, with regard to public sector communications?

The days of getting gold stars and an extra juice box for our accomplishments might be over, but that doesn’t mean we care any less about knowing when we’ve done a good job. As a government agency, it can be difficult to figure out if you’re getting your message across. Many private sector companies rely on click-through rates (CTR), which are calculated by looking at the number of people who clicked on a link in an email in relation to the number of people who received it, to big gold starhelp determine if their email campaigns are successful. But as we’ve discussed in other blogs, what works for the private sector doesn’t necessarily work for the public.

So how can your government organization measure the effectiveness of its emails? By looking at an entirely different metric altogether: Engagement Rate.

Why Engagement Rate?

Because many public sector emails are solely informational and don’t require any link clicks—say, for a tornado warning or transportation emergency—CTRs aren’t an accurate way of determining whether the message reached its intended audience. Additionally, because messages like these are urgent and need to be conveyed as quickly as possible, they generally won’t be sent at the optimal time to get the most click-throughs. Engagement Rate effectively resolves these issues. GovDelivery calculates Engagement Rate by taking the number of unique email recipients who opened an email or clicked on a link in an email over time and flagging them as engaged. The number of engaged users is divided by the total number of unique email recipients who received an email during the same time period. Activity is then tracked over a period of 90 days.

Why 90 days? Because one of the things that makes Engagement Rate such a successful metric to use is that it measures effectiveness by tracking engagement over time. Tracking Engagement Rates over time means that your organization is measuring against its own performance based on how engagement has increased or decreased over the course of the past quarter. By comparing how many subscribers opened your emails or clicked on a link one month versus another, you can start to gain an idea of what worked and what didn’t with your specific email strategy.

The comparison trap

It’s common for our clients to ask for an industry standard CTR to compare their efforts to. While this may seem like an easier way to get your hands on that Capri-Sun you so longingly covet, unfortunately it’s not the most accurate. Different sources will cite vastly different CTR percentages they consider to be successful, so there’s no real way of knowing what’s right.

With Engagement Rate, GovDelivery generally considers 50% engagement a success. However, this is where many organizations fall into the comparison trap. Just because a certain public sector agency consistently has above 50% Engagement Rates doesn’t necessarily mean their email campaigns are more effective than yours or should be mimicked. That organization might only send highly-targeted emails to a small list, and thus their Engagement Rate would be much higher than an organization responsible for sending out timely weather reports to a large number of people.

As humans, we tend to have an innate desire to compare ourselves to our peers. But if Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte decided to start comparing his lap time to his teammates instead of to his own previous times in order to measure whether his training regimen was successful, he wouldn’t be an Olympian much longer. When it comes to government communications, comparing your organization to others is a surefire way to shortchange yourself and base your strategy on misleading information. This is exactly why measuring Engagement Rate over time is so important. Every organization is unique, and in order to fully understand what worked and what didn’t, you can’t look anywhere else but in your own backyard.

Increasing your engagement

Once the 90 day period is up and you’ve calculated your Engagement Rate, what’s next? If your Engagement Rate is below 50% and you can’t quite figure out why, here are a few general tips for increasing engagement:

1) Good subject lines. The best subject lines in emails are short (usually under 50 characters), sweet and to-the-point. You want to hook your readers in while conveying exactly what’s included in the message. Trial and error is the best way to figure out what makes a subject line effective.

2) Use links. Utilize linking to avoid sending excessively long emails and to drive traffic back to your website. But make sure that the links are positioned properly and spaced out throughout the email. Don’t hold them all until the end, or you risk subscribers never getting past the “email fold” and missing out on valuable information.

3) Quality subscriber list. By making sure your list of subscribers only includes those people who are interested in the information, you increase the chance that they’ll actually engage with it. This is where utilizing a Digital Communication Management system can be especially beneficial.

To learn more about calculating your Engagement Rate, measuring engagement over time, and strategies for increasing your rate, download our new white paper, Industry Perspective on Engagement Rates for email messages.

By this point you’ve read our posts about digital communication management, Beyond Email Lists and Delivering the Right Message in the Right Way, so you know some of the benefits and features of DCM. But you want to see what it all amounts to. What you’re saying, in other words, is “Show me the money!” Well, Jerry Maguire, we can’t show you the money, but we can show you results from an excellent example of DCM in action.

The case
Founded in 1953, the U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) mission is to help Americans start, build and grow businesses. By providing millions of loans, loan guarantees, contracts, counseling sessions and other forms of assistance, holding sproutSBA has positioned itself as a backbone of our country’s small business community. But even backbones need some help connecting with their limbs. With all the useful information it had to share, SBA knew it wasn’t reaching as many potential and current small business owners as it would like, and the ones it was reaching weren’t being communicated with in the most effective or direct way possible.

So the SBA came to GovDelivery with some very specific goals:

  • Increase proactive and direct communications with key stakeholders, such as small businesses, to further its core mission
  • Expand the agency’s visibility, reach and public perception
  • Organize and automate the dissemination of information across central and regional SBA offices
  • Increase the number of website visitors to valuable online resources
  • Reduce printed newsletter distribution costs and effort
  • Ensure Section 508 compliance with its digital communications

The solution
By implementing a robust DCM solution based on the SBA’s unique needs, SBA was able to address each of those specific goals and see some pretty impressive results.

Here are a few of their results:

  • More than 65 million emails sent in the last 12 months
  • Reaching over 1 million subscribers across over 175 specific topics, such as Growing Your Business, Employment & Labor Law, Grants, and Taxes & Finance Law
  • Significant increase in Web visitors and social media fans/followers
  • Increase of 255% enrollment in the SBA’s Government Contracting 101 course

The moral of the story
Every government agency has its own unique audiences and strategies for trying to reach them. And while cumbersome traditional email listservs may have been the only option for organizations wanting to use digital communications in the past, there’s a better way to do things now. Just like SBA, you don’t have to settle for doing things the way you’ve always done them.

A DCM solution will help you expand your reach, increase efficiency and drive meaningful engagement. And if you still need more information to be convinced, check out this new white paper The Transformative Power of Communications: Digital Communication Management for the Public Sector.

By Richard Fong, Technology Project Manager

Moderate impact. Low impact. Collision. Cleared.

If you travel on highways anywhere, wouldn’t it be nice to have these types of messages delivered to your email or phone so you could anticipate a change in your route and save time?

With some cool technology, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has started doing just that.

Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to visit and speak with Tom Stidham, a developer with WSDOT. He stated that, before using a proactive digital communication system, they would post traffic information on their website and then push out alerts via Twitter. While these two channels did their job, WSDOT was looking to increase their proactive communications by providing email and SMS alerts to people traveling throughout the state of Washington.

By using GovDelivery’s Send Bulletin application programming interface (API), Tom was able to quickly a­­nd effectively integrate these alerts with their current work flow process to send automated messages to the public. These messages include traffic incidents, road conditions, and construction­ alerts.

The public can now sign up to more than 50 email and SMS alerts for different regions within the state, including areas such as the Oregon border and the Cascades, the Olympic Peninsula, and metropolitan areas such as Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma.

What does that mean for the people who live and visit Washington? They can find out what’s happening on roads throughout the state without having to constantly check Twitter or the department’s website. They get the information they need, controlling what updates they receive by subscribing only to the updates they want. And, maybe most importantly, if there’s a critical road closure (think the Skagit Bridge collapse), the SMS or email message that alerts residents and visitors to a potentially life-threatening road event can help save lives and protect property.

For more information on how you can leverage API technology to help your organization, watch my webinar, “Using APIs for success in Government."

Guest post by Jim Garrow, Operations and Logistics Manager, Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Irrelevance

When I imagined the future of government communications, I would envision morning meetings, where the comms team (ha!) gets together, each over their own personal blend of Starbucks or locally-sourced coffee (double ha!), discusses what news is breaking, reviews where the competitors are and what their goals might be, then the team lead blesses the talking points for the day and everyone dashes off to their well-appointed, yet obviously industriously worked-in offices (triple ha!).

Aside from the fact that I obviously dream about some fantasy-land, there’s more wrong with that statement than is obvious. You see, I talked about our competitors and how my fantasy comms team would defeat them gloriously, just in time for happy hour. While it’s obvious that very few folks in government communications are concerned with our competition, and it’s even more obvious that our competitors number more than most of us can count to, that’s not the problem. You see, our biggest problem isn’t losing the battle of our public’s minds and action to some nefarious industry or trade group, it’s losing that battle because no one’s heard us. It’s losing because we’ve become irrelevant. It’s that we’re not number three or four on our public’s priority list, it’s that we’re number 100, or 1,000.

A consultant that I follow on Twitter, Steve Woodruff, had a brilliant post on exactly this topic a couple of weeks ago, and I just couldn’t shake how his message, while crafted very explicitly for the consulting world rang just as true–maybe more so–for government communicators.

[Y]our biggest competition isn’t the competition. It’s the noise in your client or prospect’s mind. It’s the boss – the kids – the schedule – the office politics – the latest health problem – the job search – the fantasy football league – tomorrow’s big presentation – the upcoming vacation – the overloaded e-mail inbox.

Don’t believe me? Monitor what’s coursing through you brain for the next 2 minutes. See what people who are fighting for your attention are up against?

Now I know I just said that we don’t care about the competition, so you’re thinking, “how does this relate to us?” It relates because we’re worse than those consultants that are so concerned with what other consultants are doing. We’re worse because we (to a large degree) still think that our messaging is the only game in town. That we speak and, as we’re the government, people should listen. We shout into that ether with full faith and belief that our message resonates above all other messages. But it doesn’t work like that.

Want to know how I know? Go back to that little two-minute exercise Steve had you do. Now think about the last message you published for work. Where did the action that message implored you to undertake rank in your two-minute ordering of life? Was it one or two? Three or four? Or more like 100 or 1,000?

And the cacophony of life is only increasing. More social networks, both in meat-space and cyberspace, more responsibilities, more deadlines, higher productivity, fewer financial cushions. You know what we need to be concerned with?

The signal-to-noise ratio. How do we put forth such a clear signal that we stand out in the minds of our clients?

So, how do YOU do it?

To see the original post, click here.

Emergency communications is a critical process to get right. It literally is the difference in saving more lives when a disaster strikes. So, what exactly is the one-two punch needed to be truly effective when communicating with the public Red boxing glove concertina on white backgroundduring emergencies?

Maximum outreach plus multichannel distribution. This combination is an absolute necessity for today’s emergency communicators to be truly effective.

In my other recent posts on emergency notifications, I mentioned how reaching the maximum number of people during emergencies can help to save a lot more lives. Maximum reach needs to be a main goal for all government organizations, particularly Offices of Emergency Management. Just having a large list of subscribers doesn’t allow you to rest on your laurels. You have to actually be able to reach them when you need to. That’s why it’s critical that you use a multichannel approach when sending emergency notifications.

Think about all of the communication tools we use. Between the multiple email addresses (work, personal, etc.), mobile phone for voice and text messages, various social media profiles, and home landline phone, the number of communication channels goes on and on. This is why it’s critical for you to use multichannel distribution during an emergency. When an emergency hits, you need to use multiple channels to ensure that people get the information they need in order to take necessary precautions. Bottom line: by sending out emergency notifications through multiple channels, you are much more likely to reach them.

Many government organizations are still using a system in which they are relying solely on a landline channel to try to get a hold of people in emergencies. The problem with this approach is that a lot of people no longer use their landline phones, and those people would have to be home to get the emergency alert. With a robust, single-platform, multichannel system, you dramatically increase the chances of reaching citizens, wherever they are at the moment you’ve sent that message.

Easy Button1Maximum outreach, along with multichannel distribution, are key elements in reaching people in emergencies. There are solutions that provide multichannel communications, making it easy to integrate all of these emergency communication strategies, such as email, voice messages, SMS/text messages, and social media postings. When you have these in place, you can create one message and push it out through all of these channels at once. It’s like you’ve just pressed your very own “Easy” button!

Join us for the fourth and final podcast for more information on the power of combining maximum reach with multichannel distribution in emergencies.

Anyone who’s ever returned from vacation to an overflowing inbox knows that email, while infinitely better than the Pony Express, can still be a lot of, well, work. Add on curating weekly e-newsletters and managing multiple LISTSERVS and arrow targetsuddenly that old pony isn’t looking so bad anymore.

Earlier, we learned about the solution to this dead horse problem: Digital Communication Management (DCM). Let’s break it down further and explore why a good DCM system is so important for both the direct message your agency is delivering, and the indirect message you want to convey.

We know that email is an essential tool for nearly all businesses and government agencies. It’s one of the most effective and efficient ways to share your message, and it’s revolutionized the way average people communicate—but that doesn’t mean it can’t be better. In using listserv technology, government organizations are taking a step in the right direction by allowing citizens to sign up for separate email lists based on their interests so they receive relevant content. Although curating content for each list is a lot of work, deciding what to include and what to leave out sends the message to readers that your agency knows what’s most important to them. Unfortunately on the stakeholder end, if they no longer want to receive information, they have to manually unsubscribe to each list separately. This can be cumbersome and can discourage stakeholders from opting in to receive other information from organizations in the future.

So how does DCM fix this problem?

Push vs. Pull

When it comes to marketing, the private sector is all about one word: push. Private sector companies push their brand, push their products and push their message. So it’s no surprise that their email marketing practices should follow suit. By carefully curating exactly what information they want to pass onto subscribers, businesses always maintain the upper-hand. Anyone who’s ever gone to the mall to buy a pair of jeans and come home to an inbox stuffed with promotional emails knows just how frustrating email marketing can be. So as a government agency, it’s critical that your citizens aren’t subjected to such intrusive practices.

With a public sector digital communications platform, your government organization allows the stakeholder to choose what updates they receive. DCM flips the controlling push tactics into an empowering pull tactic. Instead of having information pushed on them, citizens are able to choose, and therefore, pull only what they want to know about. Think of it like visiting the library. If you wanted to find a book on whales but every time you entered the room a librarian shoved a pamphlet about the latest building renovations in your face, you probably wouldn’t be too pleased. The same concept applies here. But a robust public sector communications platform goes beyond just allowing stakeholders to pull information. Instead of having to manually search through an entire government website (or library) to find what they want, with a proper DCM system, citizens can simply subscribe to relevant pages and topics and have the information delivered right to their inbox.

Sending the right message

“Power to the people” isn’t just a catchy slogan; it should be a way of life when it comes to government communications. Deploying a digital communication management solution sends the message that you want your subscribers to have the most accurate, up-to-date information about the things that are important to them, and that you trust them to know what those things are.

To learn more about how a DCM system can help you send the right message in the most effective way possible, download this new white paper, The Transformative Power of Communications: Digital Communication Management for the Public Sector.

Almost as soon as email was created, people started creating email lists so they could reach others with related interests. Email list software like LISTSERV became a vital way for communities of people to interact with each other.

In 2013, email is still incredibly valuable as a Email @communication channel, playing an important role in government communications. Agencies can use email for regular outreach and emergency communications, updating citizens about services or events of interest to them. (See my previous blog on Email Finds New Life in Integrated Campaigns.)

But maintaining separate email lists is no longer the best way to manage email subscriptions at the scale that most government agencies need. Each new email list adds management overhead and cost. And while subscribers like very detailed, targeted subscriptions, they don’t like having to manage many individual subscriptions, so they are less likely to opt-in for updates.

A new class of Digital Communication Management (DCM) solutions replaces email lists and adds essential automation and integration capabilities to subscription management. With DCM, government agencies can use email more efficiently and effectively to manage citizen communications.

Defining Digital Communication Management (DCM)

A DCM solution is much more than simply a collection of email lists. By consolidating subscription management and automating the creation and distribution of content across different subscriptions, a DCM solution transcends the limitations of email lists.

  • Agencies can create many different subscription options without additional management overhead.  People are more willing to sign up for notifications from very specific lists of interest to them.
  • Citizens or stakeholders can manage their subscription profile from one location, easily adding or changing their subscriptions.

A DCM system automatically monitors websites for new content and generates updates for relevant subscribers – reducing effort for government staff and ensuring timely notifications. And it integrates easily with other channels, such as text messaging, RSS updates and social media.

Making your own case for DCM

For most government agencies, deploying a DCM solution delivers a rapid return on investment in cost savings from reducing paper processes and shifting interactions to cost-effective, digital channels. They can also help you achieve other goals of reaching more stakeholders, increasing citizen awareness of services and programs, and improving emergency communications.

GovDelivery offers a white paper, The Transformative Power of Communications: Digital Communication Management for the Public Sector, with information to help you evaluate the potential for DCM in your organization, including:

  • Guidance on calculating the Return on Investment (ROI) from DCM
  • Real-world examples of federal, state and county government agencies that have moved from email lists to cloud-based DCM, and their results
  • Guidelines for a successful DCM deployment

If you’re ready to leave email list management in the past, download this paper and see if a Digital Communication Management solution is right for your agency.

Co-written by Anne Doucot and Mary Yang

In my last post, I talked about how reaching the maximum amount of people that you can during an emergency can be the difference in saving more lives. And if you’ve been following along in the last couple of posts and podcasts from this series so far, you’ve also heard me talk about how important it is to get subscribers in addition to the use of a single platform, multichannel system. But, I know what many of you are thinking, once you get subscribers, how do you keep their contact information up-to-date?

With a single hey look hereplatform system that’s used by both your organization’s emergency communications department and public affairs office.

If you’re lucky, as an organization, you may only need to activate emergency alerts once or twice a year. That means, if your current system allows citizens to sign up to receive emergency alerts, that data may be quite old by the time you need to rely on it.

The solution to keeping contact information up-to-date is by using a comprehensive system that allows for both regular government communications and emergency notifications. The system should allow citizens to sign up for a variety of topics. With this kind of system, citizens can choose to receive updates on topics of interest and choose the method of communication they prefer (email, SMS, social media, etc.) The system should also allow citizens easy access to their profiles to provide updated contact data if they want.

As the communications department provides regular messages, the system will recognize if email addresses are still in use or if text messages are delivered. For organizations that use the same platform for their government communications and emergency notifications, sending out regular communications can continually test and cleanse the contact data for their citizens.

Join us for the third podcast for more information on how easy it can be to keep citizen contact information up-to-date.

For more analysis on current emergency notifications technology, download this recent Analyst Brief from IDC Government Insights.

%d bloggers like this: