A blog about digital government, communications, citizen satisfaction & engagement, GovDelivery, and other e-government issues
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For government communicators and IT professionals, driving traffic to the website is one clear metric that can be tracked and analyzed over time as a measure of success. And, with Google Analytics and similar tools, you can point to increased Web traffic as part of your success as an IT professional or communicator.

But in this era of digital noise, you can’t trust that simply building a good website will produce the traffic you want. If you work for a larger government organization or program you may have the budget to run a massive advertising campaign to attract visitors to your site, but if you’re like most public sector organizations and programs, you’re faced with decreasing budgets and a strong push to drive mission goals and prove value.

That’s why we believe in not just promoting your website and the content you have for the public, but also in the need to build direct digital connections with your stakeholders and nurture a relationship with them over time. That’s where digital outreach can really impact your goals in clear and measurable ways. In a recent Washington Post article on Healthcare.gov , the reporter found that:

GovDelivery…was the number-one source of referral traffic to Healthcare.gov in September and October. That means when a user came to Healthcare.gov from a link on another site, that site was frequently Govdelivery.com — more often, even, than the websites of Medicaid, the White House, and the Department of Health and Human Services…[So] all that traffic to Healthcare.gov from GovDelivery? It came through…email…Not Facebook, which accounted for roughly 2.6 percent of traffic. Definitely not Twitter, which drove only 1 percent of Healthcare.gov’s visitors to the site…

In addition to being the number-one referrer to Healthcare.gov, the service has also managed to sign up more than 1 million subscribers for the Department of Health and Human Services’ ACA email list, a company spokeswoman said. (The department’s goal is 7 million.) [emphasis mine]

Healthcare.gov screenshot

The folks in charge of running and maintaining Healthcare.gov and the marketplace recognized that they needed not just a one-time hit, but a true digital connection to communicate with stakeholders on a continual basis. Since 85% of adults with a household income of less than $30,000 and 93% of adults with a household income between $30,000 and $49,999 use email, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, it only made sense to connect with those stakeholders through digital channels.

But what does this mean for you? To start, do you know how engaged your stakeholders are with your communications? Does your website get the traffic you want it to? If individuals come to your website to seek out more information, do you know if they are coming back to check out your new content? Are you reaching all of the stakeholders you want to be reaching? These questions are inextricably linked. Reaching more stakeholders enables you to drive more website traffic, just like Healthcare.gov. And by allowing stakeholders to sign up to receive specific topics through digital channels they prefer, you now know what’s important to each individual and how they want to receive it, so you can proactively communicate relevant information when there’s something new to share. Over time, these interactions deepen your relationship with stakeholders and help build trust.

Thankfully, if you’re a GovDelivery client already, you’re in good hands. The Washington Post also reported that:

GovDelivery definitely falls in that “digital outreach” sphere…[it] is the contractor that powers just about any email alert you get from a federal (and in many areas, local) government agency. Think weather alerts, emergency notices, small business newsletters — those are all run through GovDelivery…

With more than 1,000 government organizations of all sizes across the US, UK, and Europe currently using the GovDelivery platform to connect with more than 65 million stakeholders worldwide, we’re ready and excited to help you build and maximize those stakeholder connections to meet your mission or program goals and drive real value.

For more strategies & tactics you can implement easily check out our recent Essential Digital Strategies Guide for Government Communicators . Or contact your Client Success Consultant  to find out what you can do with the GovDelivery platform to boost your outreach.

By Ryan Kopperud, Content Editor

It’s no secret that government organizations are large, complex, and ever-changing institutions. But what can be a secret is how those huge organizations responsible for communicating with hundreds of thousands of people, do so in a unified and effective way.

HandHuddleWith a wide variety of information to communicate and needs that differ between departments, regions, and even people, staying on top of communication can be a challenge to say the least.

But when an organization masters the art of interacting with their constituents, it’s a beautiful sight to see; everyone wins. The public wins when they get the information they want and need in the way that makes sense to them, and government organizations win when their job is made easier to do well.

The Farm Service Agency (FSA) is a classic example of the unity and effectiveness required to maintain communications within a complex government organization. As a division of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the FSA is responsible for communicating important updates, regulations, financial information, and more with farmers of all types in every single state.

It’s not hard to see how their work can get complicated quickly. A farmer who grows corn in northern Minnesota needs an entirely different set of regulations, updates, and information than the cattle farmer in southern Albuquerque. So how do they stay on top of communicating with such a huge and diverse audience of farmers and invested members of the public?

The FSA leverages GovDelivery’s digital communications platform to communicate the right information to the right people at the right time. The FSA uses the platform to organize its massive content into 2,500 valuable topics representing nearly every county in the United States. This helps FSA more easily manage a complex communications operation.

The FSA has nearly 3,000 administrators working to manage the creation and sending of all of that information, and therefore is able to have unique subject matter experts handle their organization’s wide variety of content needs. Outside of communicating with the external public, the FSA also uses internal topics to communicate information to their own employees, allowing them to use the same technology for interacting both inside and outside of their organization.

social-network-gridAnd for their external communications, which are sent to over 500,000 people, the FSA uses the GovDelivery platform to communicate with farmers of all types, across the country. This ensures that their updates are consistently created and sent using the same technology and allows them to consolidate their communications all under one roof.

With automation capabilities enabled on some of the information topics they provide, the FSA stays on top of the updates they need to send even further by triggering automated messages to their subscribers as well. When new content is posted on their website, GovDelivery automatically delivers the updates to their subscribers without the FSA having to lift a finger. By taking out some of the manual steps required to communicate with their stakeholders, they can stay ahead of the game and get people the information they need even more efficiently.

The Farm Service Agency is a prime example of what communications on a massive scale can look like when it’s done right. With impeccable organization, diverse content offerings, and a unique case of needing to communicate with an extreme gamut of people, the FSA has found a way to not only manage their communications with the public, but to streamline and excel at them.

By Amy Larsen, Client Success Consultant

Time is something that communicators never have enough of when it comes to their work: building their audiences, managing their brand, staying current with content, meeting the demands of their stakeholders, etc. Many times the government communicators I work with are  balancing an ever-expanding task list between a few key team members, each working to draft press releases, communicate with the media, keep the website current, prepare emergency communication strategies, respond to inquiries, and manage social media – just to name a few! Sometimes it can feel like an uphill battle, especially as demand for digital content and services grow and stakeholders expect to find everything online.

Luckily, today’s communicators have more tools to help them wrangle the different aspects of their job into a well-oiled information machine. And with a few quick strategic changes, they can save more time than ever before while meeting citizens’ needs on a consistent basis.

Here are three key steps you can take that will help you cut down on the time spent communicating,  increase your reach through more channels, and most importantly, connect to more stakeholders.

GovDelivery_ChannelsIntegration – Most clients that I engage with agree that it is no longer enough to only use a single form of communication to reach their diverse base of subscribers, but they also are not sure where the extra hours will be found to manage multiple communication platforms. While it may seem like an impossible feat, there is a solution.- Make your content channels work together in one simple process. You may have 8,000 subscribers to an email list, 10,000 Facebook fans, another 3,000 twitter followers, and another 50,000 people are viewing your website each month. Does that mean a neverending login-test-post-comment-update-edit-repeat cycle for your team? It doesn’t have to. By leveraging  tools that are specifically geared toward making your channels work together, you can cut down on the number of different channels you have to access to post your content, while maintaining a consistent style and voice throughout all your communication channels.

There are various tools out there for communicators to leverage. GovDelivery’s digital communications platform allows content that originates on one channel to be effortlessly communicated across all of your networks with one click.  And social media engagement tools like HootSuite are also helping more communicators manage their social media outlets from a single dashboard that measures the responsiveness of their audience. Furthermore, content management systems can be leveraged to push content from one channel to another with proper programming and permissions.

Collaboration_RSSAutomation – What’s better than channels communicating with each other, you ask? Channels that communicate with each other automatically. With little or no manual process at all, government agencies are able push content to multiple channels through RSS (Real Simple Syndication),  APIs (application programming interfaces), or other feeds to replicate content from one channel to another. RSS feeds are handy because they often come as a built-in feature in most content management systems, and they make it easy to send updates to subscribers whenever a Web page’s content changes. The standardized feed can then be easily read by email clients or web browsers, allowing subscribers to get information without having to continuously check Web pages for content changes.

While RSS feeds are great, APIs take automation a step further by allowing a feed from a Web portal or database to be pushed directly out to applications that interpret and deliver content to subscribers.

A great example of this is Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT). WSDOT recently connected their traffic alerts to an API that automatically pushes alerts to subscribers when road conditions in their region are impacted by weather, construction, or traffic congestion.

Social media outlets like Twitter have some great 3rd party automation options as well.   Twitterfeed is a tool that allows you to automatically post content from a blog or Web page to Twitter, making the process of posting and promoting your new content as easy as a simple click of a button.  Another great tool is WordPress’s Tweet Old Post plugin, which helps drive traffic back to older, but still relevant, pieces of content on your blog.

Coordination – Communication, done correctly, is a lot of work. To maximize your output, you’ll want to make sure that all of the work you and the rest of your agency does to reach your target audience is following some sort of unified, coordinated strategy. I’ve encountered a lot of clients who have brand-building rockstars on the communications team who work to create consistent brand image, but they often struggle with other departments within the organization independently creating and sending content through various channels with inconsistent strategy. An uncoordinated communication strategy can sometimes chip away the work that others are doing to build a consistent image and reputation for the organization, and might even be duplicating efforts of other departments. How do you address this without putting sole responsibility on one team to communicate on behalf of all departments? With coordination and standardized expectations for everyone who is responsible for communicating with your stakeholders. Marin County, CA has done a great job with this by creating a Social Media Responsibility Guidelines document, along with a best practice Social Media Playbook. These serve as mandatory training guides for anyone using social media on behalf of their department, and help promote consistent, coordinated channels of communication, each working toward the same goal. The County communications team in Marin keeps an eye on the communication efforts of individual departments without having to bear the full weight of all content creation and output themselves, meaning more of their time is free to focus on their top goals and objectives for continued public engagement and service.

By integrating channels, automating output and coordinating content generation among various players in an organization, government communicators can continue to be one step ahead of the game when it comes to meeting stakeholders’ needs for information and service.

 

In our recent webinar, “Accelerate your Outreach for Maximum Impact” our GovDelivery Engagement Consultants had dozens of questions from webinar attendees. We’ve pulled out some of the most critical questions, providing a transcript of the question and detailed answer.HandsRaised

Q: My organization is new to reaching out through digital communications. How exactly do you connect digital channels with project goals?

A: The first thing you’ll need to do is figure out what your project goals are and how to connect them with your digital communications tools. You shouldn’t just reach out through Facebook and Twitter because someone tells you you’re supposed to. You need to figure out why you’re reaching out through those specific channels, what audiences you’re trying to reach, and what metrics you’re going to use to measure success. You need to have a strategic approach for why you’re reaching out through email or Twitter and what different success factors you’ll be looking for with each type of communication. Putting project goals together with the different tools you’ll be using to reach those project goals helps you look at the whole picture. Email and social media are just tools for completing your mission objectives.

Q: My agency doesn’t reach out to the general public — only to a select group of people. What does an outreach acceleration process look like to me?

A: The outreach process doesn’t change for you just because you don’t reach out to the general public. Even if you’re only reaching out to a select group of people, all of the best practices we talked about today still apply; you just have to be more targeted in your message. If you do have a more targeted audience that you’re trying to reach, in some ways it’s even more critical that you reach them because they might not have a lot of other sources. For example if you’re the National Institute of Health and you’re reaching out to a very niche group of scientists, you might be one of the only places they find that specific information. So even though something you send out might not apply to the average person, the best practices still pertain. You’re just going to have more targeted groups sign up for your information that you’ll have to continue to reach out to.

Q: This all seems great, but how can I convince my manager of the value of this kind of outreach acceleration?

A: A lot of the tactics and data points we presented in this presentation should be useful in persuading your manager. The fact that over 92 percent of adults are online interacting through email is a really powerful statistic. There are also a lot of great government websites like www.howto.gov that offer information about why your organization should be on social media, certain social media policies you might consider implementing, and what kinds of communications tools people are using. Again, you’ll need to connect your project goals with how these tools can be used to achieve them and how you’ll measure their success. Really push the point that these are tools that the public is already using; you don’t have to hunt people down. They’re free opportunities, at least with social media, to reach out and connect with people and influence certain behaviors. The more people you reach the more effective you’re going to be in meeting your projects goals.

Q: How does intensive outreach link to behavioral change?

A: The more people subscribe to your information, the more likely they’ll receive it on a regular basis and the more likely they’ll take action. So if you’re sending out information about getting a flu shot, maybe the first four or five times someone receives it they won’t take any action, but maybe on the sixth time they will take action. For the campaigns you’re trying to promote the most, continue to send consistent messaging and eventually people will take the action that you want them to. When you have massive amounts of people getting information you just increase the number of people who are actually going to do what you’re hoping they’ll do. Maybe they’ll get a flu shot this year because of an email, and maybe they’ll also get a flu shot next year and then the year after that they’ll also get their family to get flu shots. That’s the type of behavior change that we’re talking about. With outreach acceleration you’re really trying to create a community of people who are interested in your information and reach out to them on an ongoing basis.

Q: When you talk about segment, does that mean you have to analyze your target audience first and then set target audience profiles that help you choose the outreach mechanism?

A: What we mean by segment is that, as a government organization, you’re not necessarily always sending out information that’s critical to everyone. You’re trying to reach a targeted audience in a targeted way. Yes, you should figure out who you’re communicating to and who your key stakeholders are and why they’re coming to your website to begin with. What information are they really interested in? Then, based on who your key stakeholders are, you should set up different opportunities for people to sign up. You can have a sign up for general, public information, but maybe you also want to have a sign up specifically for scientists, or a sign up for people who’ve said they’re interested in family assistance. Through GovDelivery you‘ll set up different topics, really as many topics as you want, and send information only to those people who subscribe to a specific topic. The more targeted you make your information—and again this is something we keep coming back to—the more you’re going to see success with people engaging with your information, clicking through those links, opening those emails and downloading documents. Figure out who your key stakeholders are, give people opportunities to sign up for information based on that key stakeholder group, then send targeted information.

Another tip on the topic of targeting: if you have Google Analytics installed, look at who’s coming to your website and match that up with the different sign up topics you’re offering. If people are coming to your website looking for a certain kind of information and you’re not sending out that kind of information, maybe that’s something you can reconsider. If you know what topic is really popular, put it at the top of the list when someone goes to sign up for different topics. So, in addition to targeting more specific people, there’s also ways to prioritize the different topics that you’re offering.

Q: So you can measure subscribers, but how do you measure the next steps of awareness and engagement?

A: Through GovDelivery we do have metrics that track message analytics. Yes, you’re able to track how many subscribers you have total and how many subscribers you have subscribing to different topics, but once you send out a message you’re also able to see how that message has performed. You can see how many people opened your email, how many people clicked on a link and what links they clicked on. You’re also able to manipulate the system to see what message has worked the best and had the best penetration in the community that you were reaching out to. We give you enough information to see who’s clicking on your links and who’s opening your emails and then tie that back to your project goals.

Q: You mentioned that on the sixth time someone gets an email they might go get a flu shot. What can organizations do to make their messages more compelling in driving those actions?

dl_th-bp_emailguideA: A great source of ideas for that is our Email Best Practices Guide, which we have a link to in the webinar. In addition to talking about effectiveness and efficiency we have a whole section on engagement. We provide tons of examples for you on how to make your message more interesting and relevant and how to construct the most impactful bulletins.

Q: Is there one GovDelivery tool that you would recommend as best for increasing subscriptions?

A: The overlay has statistically shown to have a huge impact. Many organizations we’ve worked with have seen, on average, a 250 to 500 percent increase in new subscribers just from implementing an overlay. It’s something that is so simple to do, but has such a large impact on your subscriptions. The overlay is a very simple, unobtrusive box that pops up when someone visits your website. Visitors can easily “x” out of the box if they’re not interested, but once they do sign-up for information the box will no longer pop-up when they visit your website. The idea is that if people are already showing up to your website, why not enlist them to come back for more? Why not present the opportunity for them to easily reach out and connect with you? It’s by far the most effective tool we have.

This is just a small portion of a great Q&A, following a thorough webinar presentation. View the full webinar now.

Though Harold and the Purple Crayon  will always be a timeless classic, the term “storytelling” probably conjures up images of kindergarten carpets and night-lights rather than innovative marketing tactics.

34th Deauville Film Festival - RecountDespite this, the concept of storytelling in communications is actually making a big comeback. As this article on the Content Marketing Institute website, “Corporate Storytelling from Kevin Spacey” notes, audiences are moving away from the traditional means of marketing and consumption and demanding better stories and better delivery. Kevin, who stars in the Netflix hit original series House of Cards, argues that the success of the show and its non-traditional method of delivery prove that companies should give the audience “what they want, when they want it, in the form they want it in.”

That’s all well and good for television, sure, but what does it actually mean for your government organization? Well, a few things. Let’s take a look:

Customers want useful content

Seems like a no-brainer, right? Unfortunately many organizations get so caught up in proving they know how to use Pinterest or Twitter that they forget what’s at the core of their communications plan: useful information. Government agencies are uniquely positioned to provide stakeholders with information they can’t find anywhere else. And in the world of social media, content is king. So does that mean you should just throw everything you’ve got on Facebook and hope for the best? Not exactly.

But they also want the best content

A big part of communicating well is figuring out what you want to communicate. Just because you have all the statistics on sparrow migration in the Midwest for the last thirty years doesn’t mean you should share them. Narrowing in on the best stories is essential to a good communications plan. But don’t you need a huge PR budget and loads of fancy data to figure out what the best stories are? Nope! Your stakeholders tell you what they want every single day through link clicks and email opens; the question is simply whether or not you’re paying attention. The data for what your audiences want is there, you just need to collect and analyze it.

And they want it delivered in the best way

commcircleNow that you’ve got an idea of your most popular topics, what do you do with them? According to Kevin and the Content Marketing Institute, how you deliver your stories is just as important as the stories themselves. Don’t be fooled into thinking everything has to be boiled down into 140 character Twitter sound-bites to get noticed; different stories warrant different delivery methods. Some stories need to be longer to be truly impactful and that requires a communications channel that allows for depth and complexity – something not available when you’re limited to 140 characters. The truth is audiences want to engage with content in different ways, and different channels of communication – email, blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube, etc. – provide different unique opportunities.

Want more? You can learn about incorporating storytelling into your government communications plan at our annual Federal Communications Event: The Power of the Message. Featuring a keynote address by Paul Smith, author of the best-selling book Lead with a Story, the event will focus on utilizing storytelling techniques to help you better meet your organization’s mission goals.

awardLast week, winners of the 2013 Best of the Web Awards were announced, offering an opportunity to see how state and local government organizations are leveraging the web to communicate with the public. Cities, counties and states were judged based on their demonstration of innovation, usability and functionality for users. Honorees were also required to possess sites “that display effective governmental efficiency and service delivery.”

Alameda County, California, took first place in the county category for their use of a clean and easily navigable website as well as their successful social media strategies. They have built an intuitive website that is highly compatible with mobile devices, making it easy for visitors to get information quickly on their terms. The County also clearly displays all the ways the public can connect with the County by placing prominent digital communication and social media icons throughout their website. This allows Alameda County’s website visitors to connect with the County in the ways they want, receiving information through communication channels that are relevant to them.

“We’ve focused a lot on our citizen engagement with our open data initiative — I think that’s very fresh and current,” said Tim Dupuis, the interim director of the Alameda County Information Technology Department and the county’s interim registrar of voters. “Coupled with social media and how aggressively we’re going after the mobile apps space and self- service — all of these things combine to make something that really engages our public.” (GovTech.com)

Alameda County is just one example of a government organization utilizing technology to enhance government-to-citizen communications. Many of the organizations nominated are doing awesome things, and we here at GovDelivery are excited to congratulate a number of our clients on their awards. Congratulations to additional GovDelivery clients:

County Category:

1st Place- Alameda County, California

3rd Place- Orange County, California

4th Place- Sacramento County, California

5th Place- Stearns County, Minnesota

City Category:

2nd Place- Riverside, California

3rd Place- Raleigh, North Carolina

Finalist- Palo Alto, California

State Category:

5th Place- Maine

Finalist- Nebraska

To see a complete list of winners, click here.

To find out how your organization can be considered for a Best of the Web award, click here.

TruthinessTurns out Stephen Colbert may have been on to something when he coined the term “truthiness.” According to a recent study by U.K. market research group Ipsos Mori that compared British citizens’ perceptions of statistical facts to the actual numbers, most people have a pretty skewed idea of the truth. As this article by The Guardian suggests, society is teeming with misinformation and misperceptions. And despite popular opinion, the blame can’t necessarily be placed on politicians or the media alone.

There are a variety of factors that come into play when we absorb and interpret information. From inherent biases and shortcuts to an inability to process very large or small numbers, it seems the odds are against anyone trying to convey a clear and concise message. So with all of this in mind, how do you as a government organization ensure that your message is easily received and understood by your stakeholders?

Sorry, Stephen, but it looks like “truthiness” may have met its match. With multichannel digital communications and a three-part approach, you can provide official content and set the record straight.

Here’s how:

1) Establish

The Internet has changed how people get their information. Gone are the days when face-to-face interaction and paper products were the primary methods of delivery. Adopting multichannel digital communications such as email, SMS and social media helps you offer information how, when and where your stakeholders want it. By allowing users to choose which channel they prefer to receive timely, relevant information, government organizations show that they understand and respect the needs of their citizens, which helps establish trust. When trust is built, it’s easier to engage and educate. Stakeholders must first view you as a reliable, straightforward source of information before they can trust you.

2) Engage

Once you’ve established trust with your stakeholders you need to engage them on a deeper level. Using social media to open up communication as a two-way street shows that you value your citizens as contributors, not just consumers. But simply retweeting a follower or responding to a Facebook comment isn’t enough. Once you’ve engaged your stakeholders through one channel, you need to re-engage them consistently. As Liz Azyan outlines in the white paper Digital Communications and Channel Shift in Government, re-engaging with your citizen base increases participation and feedback.

3) Educate

Now that you’ve established trust and engaged your stakeholders, you can set the record straight when you notice incorrect information. Government websites are great sources of information, but they’re also notoriously difficult for users to navigate. By utilizing multiple channels to direct stakeholders back to the specific parts of your website they want to see, you increase the likelihood that they will actually read and absorb the information instead of skimming and misinterpreting it. Constantly contacting isn’t necessarily communicating. You have to make sure your message is being received and understood before effective communication can occur.

The truth is a tricky thing, but it’s not as elusive as you might think. With a good multichannel digital communications strategy, government organizations can both reduce misperceptions and help create a culture of transparency, trust and accurate information.

What are some ways you help effectively communicate the truth?

man and phoneAs you may know, the digital online world has definitely adopted the mobile friendly idea. For me, as a designer and web developer, I continuously look back on recent projects to adapt and apply changes as necessary. Earlier this year, my largest project was to redevelop the GovDelivery.com site into a mobile friendly responsive site.

Here are the top 5 things I learned from the project and the information I gained while tackling the project.

Lesson 1: Responsive design and mobile design are different
Responsive design is mobile friendly, but not strictly a mobile solution. The idea is really for a website to be able to respond to various devices and screen sizes. However, it is still a full web design. If, as the designer, you were to strictly focus on the mobile aspect of the design, you may inadvertently skip over some great user-friendly options that work well for non-mobile options.

Lesson 2: Don’t forget to address site navigation early on
Keep your navigation simple and clean, avoiding dropdowns if you can. If you can’t, keep it to one level and disable for mobile solutions, so that you can add a JavaScript selection menu solution like SelectNav.js instead of PC dropdowns.

Lesson 3: Start with a grid (they are your friend)
Grids are not a new concept; they have been used since print publishing began, and applying them correctly in a responsive site makes a big difference in being able to proportionally scale your site’s content. Most sites are built on a grid system to begin with, so if you are retrofitting an existing site, this helps to avoid having to rebuild the whole layout.

Lesson 4: Your fonts and font styling should be responsive as well
Like your site, your font type should respond to different devices and scale accordingly, especially on smaller cell phones. In this case you need to bring up the size of the font and increase line spacing so that it can be easily read. You may also consider swapping out hard to read fonts such as display fonts if you are using the @font-face class.

Lesson 5: Last but not least, make sure all of your images are quality and sized well
Images can make or break your site and a bad one on any device doesn’t look good, especially now with the adaption of retina displays. While keeping mobile users in mind, look at the quality and quantity of your images and also the bandwidth limitations of mobile connections and devices.

When adding images to your site, crop them beforehand to reduce file size and make sure to include styling for image scaling if the images are important to the content. Also know that there are other options as well, such as using multiple versions of an image or hiding the images. This can impact load time, so you may want to avoid it since they will still load in the background.

Mobile isn’t going anywhere and mobile design is still evolving. Don’t be afraid of going mobile friendly. It may seem daunting at first, but it can be done. I hope that my experience has given you some helpful insight and that you feel a little more informed on what responsive design is and how using it can make your website much more user-friendly.

To read more about responsive design, here are a few more resources.

Must Know the Facts About Responsive Design

Common Misconceptions About Responsive

Ten Things You Need to Know About Responsive Design

What Journalists Need to Know About Responsive Design

By this point you’ve read our posts about digital communication management, Beyond Email Lists and Delivering the Right Message in the Right Way, so you know some of the benefits and features of DCM. But you want to see what it all amounts to. What you’re saying, in other words, is “Show me the money!” Well, Jerry Maguire, we can’t show you the money, but we can show you results from an excellent example of DCM in action.

The case
Founded in 1953, the U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) mission is to help Americans start, build and grow businesses. By providing millions of loans, loan guarantees, contracts, counseling sessions and other forms of assistance, holding sproutSBA has positioned itself as a backbone of our country’s small business community. But even backbones need some help connecting with their limbs. With all the useful information it had to share, SBA knew it wasn’t reaching as many potential and current small business owners as it would like, and the ones it was reaching weren’t being communicated with in the most effective or direct way possible.

So the SBA came to GovDelivery with some very specific goals:

  • Increase proactive and direct communications with key stakeholders, such as small businesses, to further its core mission
  • Expand the agency’s visibility, reach and public perception
  • Organize and automate the dissemination of information across central and regional SBA offices
  • Increase the number of website visitors to valuable online resources
  • Reduce printed newsletter distribution costs and effort
  • Ensure Section 508 compliance with its digital communications

The solution
By implementing a robust DCM solution based on the SBA’s unique needs, SBA was able to address each of those specific goals and see some pretty impressive results.

Here are a few of their results:

  • More than 65 million emails sent in the last 12 months
  • Reaching over 1 million subscribers across over 175 specific topics, such as Growing Your Business, Employment & Labor Law, Grants, and Taxes & Finance Law
  • Significant increase in Web visitors and social media fans/followers
  • Increase of 255% enrollment in the SBA’s Government Contracting 101 course

The moral of the story
Every government agency has its own unique audiences and strategies for trying to reach them. And while cumbersome traditional email listservs may have been the only option for organizations wanting to use digital communications in the past, there’s a better way to do things now. Just like SBA, you don’t have to settle for doing things the way you’ve always done them.

A DCM solution will help you expand your reach, increase efficiency and drive meaningful engagement. And if you still need more information to be convinced, check out this new white paper The Transformative Power of Communications: Digital Communication Management for the Public Sector.

By Richard Fong, Technology Project Manager

Moderate impact. Low impact. Collision. Cleared.

If you travel on highways anywhere, wouldn’t it be nice to have these types of messages delivered to your email or phone so you could anticipate a change in your route and save time?

With some cool technology, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has started doing just that.

Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to visit and speak with Tom Stidham, a developer with WSDOT. He stated that, before using a proactive digital communication system, they would post traffic information on their website and then push out alerts via Twitter. While these two channels did their job, WSDOT was looking to increase their proactive communications by providing email and SMS alerts to people traveling throughout the state of Washington.

By using GovDelivery’s Send Bulletin application programming interface (API), Tom was able to quickly a­­nd effectively integrate these alerts with their current work flow process to send automated messages to the public. These messages include traffic incidents, road conditions, and construction­ alerts.

The public can now sign up to more than 50 email and SMS alerts for different regions within the state, including areas such as the Oregon border and the Cascades, the Olympic Peninsula, and metropolitan areas such as Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma.

What does that mean for the people who live and visit Washington? They can find out what’s happening on roads throughout the state without having to constantly check Twitter or the department’s website. They get the information they need, controlling what updates they receive by subscribing only to the updates they want. And, maybe most importantly, if there’s a critical road closure (think the Skagit Bridge collapse), the SMS or email message that alerts residents and visitors to a potentially life-threatening road event can help save lives and protect property.

For more information on how you can leverage API technology to help your organization, watch my webinar, “Using APIs for success in Government."

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